Federico Herrero and the Truthfulness of Colours

Federico Herrero and the Truthfulness of Colours

Federico Herrero and the Truthfulness of Colours

ArtPremium takes you to discover Costan Rican artist Federico Herrero whose colorful patterns on paintings or murals enliven the environment and cross boundaries.

Published on ArtPremium Magazine Winter 2020 in the “We Believe in” section

As well as clouds can form shapes in the observation of the sky, the artist uses the vividness of its chromaticalLY painting to form a visual sign language.

Open structures in colors could encapsulate Federico Herrero’s body of works. The Costa Rican artist believes in the inclusivity of a language of vibrant shapes and forms. “Creating an openness” for the minds of different backgrounds and to reflect oneself in is the pursuit of his art. It translates in the landscape of a flourishing nature mirroring the spectator’s consciousness.

ArtPremium conversed with Herrero about the questions emerging from his monumental paintings, notably the notion of space in his site-specific works, the influence of Costa Rica, and the spiritual meaning behind his artistic process. 

Your work has taken you to intervene chromatically in the world and incorporate art into public spaces, recurring to muralism through different materials. Why did you choose to use the colors you show in your work? 

Herrero “I connect a lot with the notion of color. In my case, I try to move away from a certain propagandistic or marketing notion, I rather think about color in terms of energies and in terms of connection with sound. For me, color can also relate to a certain aspect of our nature that is more about poetry and musicality. How we connect with the world.” 

 

Federico Herrero

Beso, 2019 – Oil and acrylic on canvas – 126 x 165 3/8 in – 320 x 420 cm
Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York

Our modern use of communication through the manipulation of colors implies a constant activation of our emotions and feelings. Yet as we are surrounded by their overused symbolism in our daily life, we fail to question the very notion of colors remote from advertising and psychology. Herrero’s artworks help to rejuvenate their primary meaning and nature, as the idea of the “very impression of life” has a similar simplicity to beauty arousing in the natural world. Herrero perceives those energies flow in the artistic process and feels the presence of every artifact and inanimate objects of our world. 

As well as clouds can form shapes in the observation of the sky, the artist uses the vividness of its chromatic painting to form a visual sign language. Although not deprived of a political aspect, it is rather evoking what can be meaningful in the observation of an urban environment, a museum, a room, or a wall. 

 

Open Alphabet Installation -Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York

Your work has been described as having a musical property, and most importantly perhaps as being a visual vocabulary. What does “telepathic painting” stands for in your work? 

It’s an idea that relates to the notion of color and painting jumping from place to place. I see it as a way of observation also, in the way that when you start noticing something, in the way gradually it starts to appear in the space more and more. For me, there is this notion of interconnection or interconnectivity, with what you are looking for and how things start to come up in the space. It is of course a metaphor, of how we understand space and a metaphor of sometimes how what we have in our mind is also projected into space as well.”

The artist expands on the concept of meaning interconnection in his synesthetic prism, connecting vision with sound, volume, and musicality, mental thinking, and being physically present in the space while experiencing energies flowing and reverie. Federico Herrero considers the open structure of meaning as the openness and unfixed of the interpretations. The pigments, jumping from place to place, become the projection and mirror of one’s thoughts and life experiences. His colorful arrangements of geometrical forms function thus as endless openings on other dimensions.

The richness of his joyful pastel color language stems from the engaging interaction with the viewers, the space architecture, the country’s particular culture. Unconscious references we possess manifest in the way the spectator enjoys the freedom of interaction in his art. His work Mapamundi in 2003 in Havana inside a swimming pool was directed towards children to liberate a playful yet mature feeling of  “flying freely in the world” and made them look at the world from another perspective.

His immersive work expands our way of seeing and colors add depth to urban structures. The expansion relies on the space possibilities free from the intrinsic restrictive constraints of the canvas and the frame. By unifying the dimensional space and interconnecting disconnected areas or places, his paintings create renewed interaction and awareness.

 

Untitled, 2018 – Oil, acrylic on canvas – 65 x 59 in. – 165.0 x 150.0 cm –
Courtesy James Cohan Gallery, New York

 

Your paintings involve the movement of the viewer, as it’s taking over streets, museum architectures. How do you take into account in your work in situ the urban environment of the cities where you exhibit? 

“I think that when I go to site-specific intervention or work, the main aspect for me is to be physically present in the space. From there, it is somehow to be open for changes to appear, to be affected by the environment, and sometimes it has to do with the culture of the place, or with the people I’m working with immediately. It has to do with the context – political context sometimes.  It is something about creating landscapes inside of another landscape, to create spaces within spaces. It is not so much about building something pre-done or preconceived and placing it in a kind of a violent way, but about creating a certain understanding of the context.”

The experience of creating the artwork is thus what generates the powerful social value of his art, be it towards communities with site-specific intervention or when the work emerges from unconventional surfaces like streets grounds, buildings, corners, ceilings, and windows. Transformed in illuminated landscapes, the gray architectures or the monochromatic minimalism of museums rooms become something radically different, as materially alive as the lively flora and fauna of Herrero‘s tropical birthplace in San José. The painting thus activates a certain perception and allows us to see beyond what is immediately visible in the space.

How did Costa Rica have an impact on your work? And would you please comment on the positioning of Costa Rica into the contemporary art market? 

“I think in my personal case it had a huge impact. At some point when I started my work, I chose to come back to Costa Rica and do my practice here: in a way it became a force for me and for my work.As an artist, it is something about the structure and the balance between urban structure and nature that I really love. It is the structure that I apply to the work as well. When I am doing the painting, the way the picture is developed is very certainly close to what I see in the environment, which is a kind of self-constructed image.

 

Where I am from in Costa Rica the structure of the contemporary art world in a way is very good because there are a lot of good institutions and a really good amount of artists. We don’t have many collectors and there is a certain frustration for local artists who do the work even though they are not a lot of people buying contemporary art locally. It might change but I am very lucky to work with galleries internationally. This became a very important aspect for me, to be able to stay here while not having to deal with the lack of collectors to support the work.

 

Installation view, 21st Century- Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Japan, 2011
Courtesy of the artist

Federico Herrero is constantly in search of evolution in his artistic process so as to find a new language to express in his work. Today his internal ambition “to impress [him]self” drives him to grow as an artist as well as the direct observation of the urban structure in Costa Rica where he lives. His Alphabet project was presented through worldwide collaborations with museums and with the help of galleries such as James Cohan Gallery in New York, Sies + Höke Galerie in Düsseldorf, and Galeria Luisa Strina in Sao Paulo. His other solo shows and next projects in 2020 will be concentrated in Latin America at the Pivô art center and in his native San José (Museo Nacional de Costa Rica).

Hitomi Sato and the Attraction of Light

Hitomi Sato and the Attraction of Light

Hitomi Sato and the Attraction of Light

Sense of Field – Various dimensions

 

The Japanese emerging artist based in Tokyo has a notable background in architecture and design from her study at the Musashino Art University that impacted her aesthetic. Focused on the harmony of light and humans, Hitomi Sato finds inspiration in the observation of everyday unexpected beauty produced by organic elements crossing one another by sheer chance. The unveiling of rays of light touching asphalt, or the interaction between the natural laws of the weather and high-tech are all examples of the optic play she integrates in her immersive and harmonious artworks.

As she discusses her creation process, and her vision of the future of contemporary art and technology, Hitomi Sato expands on the role of the spectator’s intervention in achieving the release of resonances of one’s inner world and memories.

ArtPremium: What is the role of light in your artworks ?

Hitomi Sato “I treat the light as a medium. When we see the environment we see it through the light, which means that, as time goes by, it looks different, it changes, and you feel the time difference. But at that point, when we see the environment, we do not just see itour body starts reacting and integrating into the particular environment. When you go back to daily life, there is so much information surrounding you that this body reaction doesn’t happen because the body is getting stiff. So what I am trying to do with the light is to release the tension of that stiff body, and I am trying to find out what is the best way to do it.”

The core essence of her art reveals itself in the tangibility and multi-sensorial experience. The temporal and spatial holistic approach in her Sense of Field (2016) work, a glimmering walkway packed with optic fibre-like radiant light film is telling of the artist’s interactive play with both the viewer and the artwork. “The audience has to feel”, and this sparking of body memory is the realisation of how the observer’s body will change when immersing itself into her optic and spatial illusion. Light, and especially natural light, has a polymorphic effect, and Hitomi Sato stresses on the freedom to choose the meaning we may find in the internal and physical involvement with the art piece, as a unique interaction, each time different.

Your installations immerse the viewer in your works while involving movement and touch. What is the role of the body in engaging ourselves with art?

Hitomi Sato : “Body involvement is very interesting because this happens without my intention in creating any particular object. There is no message in my art; I’d rather say that my art’s function is to nurture the mind and body of the observer, so that they can really define or feel their relationship between the inner and outer. Art is not just for the eyes, it is interesting for us, the creators, to make the audience understand that there are many ways to appreciate it using the five senses of the human body, including smelling, touching… The human body is great because it is not only the sight and the eyes which detect the walls surrounding you, the whole body is reacting to what they see and feel.”

 

What kind of colours do you usually tend to integrate and associate with light?

Hitomi Sato “My primary interest is in light, colour comes next. First of all, I am focusing on the light, and when I start focusing on the changes or metamorphose, then I think about the colour as a very subtle addition. I take great care when I choose the colours because, for me, it must be transparent, clear, and clean. I will not just use primary colours, but rather a subtle colour, which is closer to the light, to the sunlight.”

As a cascade of colorful panels hung from her installation Heart Washing Room, Hitomi Sato’s meticulous and elegant work engage with the landscape or urban architecture surrounding the artwork, taking into account the rhythm associated with the constant growing of a city or the dichotomic framework between order and disorder. As she explores the relationship between human beings and nature, her art forms a bridge between the outside and the inside, as a means to enhance the sense of feel. In Light of Temple that Sato created in a Buddhist temple out of an exquisite light phenomenon, she intents to recreate the serenity of being in a hut and feeling nature’s special beauty.

Thus, greatly inspired by the Japanese culture, she mentions the sunpou寸法 (measurement) specific to the Japanese strict way of making regulated or customized actions, sharing the time, or judging collectively materials and things. The thorough Japanese control, patterns, keeping a distance is analogous to the fusuma, the Japanese sliding doors made of paper, whose primary function is to shut down the outside world while still being able to feel the slightest change of the environment, light or sound. Feeling this blurry and flexible limit between the inner energies and the external nature is what Hitomi Sato renews in her artworks.

Organic elements often play a role in your installations or objects. How do you establish relations between the natural environment and the universe through the human sensesalso regarding the Komorebi effect?

I am always interested in the human being. As you live, there is an accumulation of customs, for example common sense, which comes from all the information accumulated in one’s life. What I like to try is to release those elements from the human body and mind, and let the audience or observer be free from it. What I personally think about the modern world is that we are losing the archetypethe original, basic or fundamental things are now broken up. We lost the focal point and the point of reliance.

I am trying to evoke the primitive memories of the human being by causing the vibration which can connect us to the primitive or the cosmos. When you see the shimmering water or the komorebithe light pouring through the tree leaveswe feel that it is such a lovely landscape. Yet, that kind of feeling started from the old archetypical memory, which maybe the primitive people also had. That, I think, is the vibration and the repetition of light and nature.”

 

ArtPremium: Through the influence of design you also use ordinary or plain materials in your different works. How do you integrate nature and design in your work? Is it a way to reconnect everyday objects with immaterial or spiritual senses?

Hitomi Sato “I think the process of making my art is more important, and especially regarding the materials. I am always trying to see things purely so that the materials shouldn’t be seen as materials. For example, if you take the example of acrylic, we sort of have a presumed concept that this thing is transparent and hard, but I intentionally tried to break that prejudice, just like the primitive people who have never seen acrylic before. So my main function and main concern is to deconstruct the already constructed concept and way of seeing.”

Hitomi Sato first studied architecture, without aiming to become an architect as she was more concerned about the performance space, the philosophical aspect of degeneration,“ how one piece a wall will affect the human being, and his mind and body,” and the Japanese unique way of sensing time and space. She continued her study in a graduate school with a major in science of design, where she studied basic theories of design and the Bauhaus. Her minimalistic design and various works have been exhibited in numerous countries since 2012, from a Wall exhibition in Bologna, Italy, to a project in Melbourne, Australia around the tea ceremony. Her more recent works are collaborations between architecture and art, as well as the study of the ever-present intricate relationship between individuals and nature. While exploring the three fields of art, architecture, and design, Hitomi Sato’s aesthetical aspiration is now to show the audience how to touch the light and to depict the morning sun.

 

Imaginary Landscapes of Laura Berson

Imaginary Landscapes of Laura Berson

Imaginary Landscapes of Laura Berson

Through her use of poetic and profound subject matter, Laura Berson is on a quest to figure out her position in the world in relation to the elements that surround us.

Specialising in portrait and landscape photography and having won multiple awards, Berson has a professional background as an actress, screenwriter, and filmmaker. Her work focuses on the treatment of pictorial and cinematographic light, in which she refers to the dramatic use of light explored by the Dutch and Flemish painters from the seventeenth and early eighteenth century as a source of inspiration. Her artistic practice explores how the body, mind and nature are all interconnected. There is an ever-present element of nature in her work that is related to macro- and micro-organisms, things we do not see, but things that exist, and how everything is connected yet somewhat disconnected at the same time. She tries to express all that she doesn’t know,what she feels as a human being and her perception of the world, in order to find the essence of something. Her conceptualised artistic practice allows her to play on forms by expressing the infinitely large and infinitely small. 

EFNI 3

From the series “Efni”, 2018, C-print. Courtesy of the artist.

Berson began practising photography at age 19, and it is through her sensitivity and softness that she is inclined to approaching themes around the body of women, mixing eroticism and fantasy, and conveying a subtle world in which strength and fragility are two sides of the same coin. Her landscapes are often a purified attempt to transcribe an architectural universe in which Man is erased by its smallness. By orchestrating light and staging, she gives free reign to her sensibility and seeks to transcribe reality into a dreamlike and reassuring image. To dive out of everyday life allows her to better understand her positioning in the world from an objective point of view. Berson’s influence is varied, ranging from elements of the universe, nature, the environment, to how all of these overlap with one another in order to form a more complex system. Our position in the world and the footprint we leave on the environment are themes that are also explored, as well as how our bodies respond to illness. She is particularly attached to show that which we do not see, stating that some illnesses are not visible to the human eye at first glance, yet that doesn’t mean that the pain one is enduring does not exist, and to explore these ideas in an empathetic manner.

In 2013, she directed a documentary on identity and its relationship to art after having worked on various short films and clips as chief camera operator and assistant. Berson worked briefly in the fashion industry where she notes that we are all transcribing to unattainable ideals of what is considered the perfect body, or image, and that we are conditioned to think in certain ways through exploitation of these images. She felt a misconnection in the treatment of human beings, which led her to feel as though the industry was meaningless and sanitised. The true essence of what is meant to be human is lost, so in her work she tries to portray women (and human beings in general) as they really are, depicting them as imperfect while she steers away from stereotypes, showcasing their sensitivity and strength.

In October 2014 Berson recalls, “I came across an article about women who are sold as slaves in Iraq and Syria. It shocked me, even if this practice is not new. In early January 2015, I learned in a dreadful document from the Iraqi news agency Iraqinews (reported by the Parisian) of the prices these women are sold for, and how they are atrociously reduced to slavery. The novelty for me was that the sale price of these women was made public, official, written in black and white, and the older the woman, the less her worth. It’s as if they were advertised in some form of catalogue, except that the items are not clothes or furniture, but women of all ages. They are sold with a thirty-four-page “manual” on elaborate rape, like a product’s purchase notice. It’s easy to imagine for an object, much less for a human being. This instrumentalisation deeply shocked me”. 

In response to this article, she presented a photo exhibition Ici et Maintenant at the Maison de la Mixité in Paris, alongside the association Ni Putes Ni Soumises. Inaugurated on 25th of November 2015, a day of struggle of violence against women, Ici et Maintenant showcases portraits of women and girls in light of the inhumane acts of certain cultures that still practice modern-day slavery. They are all depicted in the same fashion against a black background, where the women are dressed in a simple black T-shirt with a slate around their necks on which appears a price, and from time to time, a word. Their faces express a feeling of sadness, sorrow, despair, anger or incomprehension, symbolising the fact that women far too often have their identity stripped to a mere number and are treated as objects in society, and are considered inferior to that of men. The images in this series are presented as if it were someone you knew, to heighten the emotional attachment to the inexplicable ways, in which women are still treated in society today within certain cultures.

Ici & Maintenant

The artist and the series “Ici & Maintenant”, 2015, C-Print

Her work shares an interest in the investigation of identity and the place that each individual occupies in the world in relation to space, body, and consciousness. In her series Percipere, she experiments with a metaphysical doubt in a concrete way. The images pose certain questions, such as whether the body is connected to the mind, and reflect an impression of a world without meaning. The basis of the project lies in the way in which reality is constructed; a process in which our five senses intervene, and in a disorganised manner, cause our perception to change. This phenomenon referred to as derealisation, which simply put, is a disorder in which we perceive the self and the environment in a strange way. She raises this sense of not belonging to the world and the need to find a balance between these two points.

Le mythe d'Endomètre

From the series “Le mythe d’Endomètre”, 2018, C-Print. Courtesy of the artist.

Berson was heavily influenced by the contemplative slowness of the film ‘The Sacrifice’ by Russian director Tarkovsky in her series Zhertva. She reflects this ambiance in her work through an ever-present solemn element, and tries to transcribe this feeling of loneliness that is felt in the film, with the main character being on a quest for the meaning of life surrounded by elements of nature which are always present but in unusual ways. It explores how everything is connected yet somewhat disconnected at the same time, and how our relationship to the body and our relationship to the world are deeply intertwined. She articulates a physical space and a lived space, with our experiences of life being both concretely and culturally constructed within our environment, and poses the question as to how the body is built in relation to the space we inhabit in the world.

Berson’s photographic practice is identified as a search for the essence of something, an identity we can prescribe to, in relation to that which we are surrounded by, in which multiple realities are possible. She invites the viewer to explore the sensitivities to her varied subject matters in an ethereal manner. 

Berend Strik, Deciphering the Artist’s mind

Berend Strik, Deciphering the Artist’s mind

Berend Strik, Deciphering the Artist’s mind

Deciphering The Artist’s Mind: fremdkorper (Studio Koreans)

How is art transcending the artist’s historical and physical creative action? Dutch artist Berend Strik’s ongoing project Deciphering the Artist’s mind is the unfinished travel initiated in 2012 around past and present art memory, taking form in an immense body of photography artworks. 

Since the visit of Manhattan studio of Marcel Duchamp, Strik has been taking for photography subjects these particular private places, where the energies and vibrations of the creative process suddenly reveal their history through the eyes of the Dutch artist. Photographing parts of the studio architectural space, Strik prints his work and adds multi-layered narratives through colored textiles stitched on the surface, composing a completely transformed work. Informative, interpretative, a tribute to influential figures, his three-dimensional photographs are like a mise en abyme, the capture of an exclusive moment of exchange between Strik and the different artists while conveying a personal theoretical reflexion on art. 

Deciphering the Artist Mind – Studio W.D.K.

The international artists of each 68 studios visited by Berend Strik, – be them contemporaries or renowned past art history figures, like the studios of Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, John Baldessari, Martha Rosler, and others – are dimly present in the works at a phantasmagoric level. He demonstrates the intemporality of the creator’s soul, absent from the studio but still existing in the dialogue he establishes with the electrifying resonance of the studios’ creation memory.   

 Revolving his problematics around the myths of art creation, he endeavors to converse with the genius consecutively coming into being, artwork after artwork, in an intimate physical setting. The magic of the studio appropriated by the photograph is thus an endless investigation of the artistic mind projected into reality, and the seemingly impossible quest to conjure up the artists’ essence.   

Deciphering Artist Studio's Mind - John Baldessari

Deciphering the Artist Mind – Studio W.D.K.

 In the continuity of the ambitious photography project, Berend Strik is pursuing the project with a book Deciphering the Artist’s mind designed by the internationally famous Dutch graphic designer Queen of Books Irma Boom. Promising to be a “real oeuvre d’art”, the illustrations of the book associated with Berend Strik texts and with Marja Bloem will offer new narratives and a complementary outlook to his artwork. Completed with a conversation of Berend Strik with selected artists, the book will be published in spring 2020. 

 Corinne Timsit and Berend Strik are announcing their collaboration on current and future projects. 

 Berend Strik was born in Nijmegen, The Netherlands in 1960, and lives and works in Amsterdam. He has exhibited in numerous art galleries, solo exhibition shows and major art institutions (Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, Tilton Gallery: New York, 5th Biennale d’Art Contemporain de Lyon…) and is present in large collections (The Centraal Museum, Utrecht; Museum de Lakenhal, Leiden and Haags Gemeente Museum, S’Gravenhage)

 

 

 

Carlos W. Desrosiers:  The Experience, an immersive exhibition in Paris

Carlos W. Desrosiers:  The Experience, an immersive exhibition in Paris

Carlos W. Desrosiers:  The Experience, an immersive exhibition in Paris

“When a piece is done, it always feels like a complete song to me.
There is no more instruments, notes, or tones needed.“

 

Carlos W. Desrosiers’ upcoming exhibition from June 23 to July 31 at VOS Paris challenges the status quo of exhibiting art on limited formulated canvas. The American self-taught artist from New York presents The Experience, revealing his original 9 paintings from his “What you see” The collection splashing out from their core basis and becoming materially alive in the entire space.  

 

 

Liberated from its frame, the vitality of the painting invades the room on various supports, which results in an augmented viewing experience. Like independent phenomenons emerging from the original work of his paintings, his ‘Figures’ take up space on the windows or walls. Fragments are hanged to the ceiling, while three-dimensional sculptural unities become autonomous living organisms. The jumping off point art piece multiplies itself through an explosion into other lives in the exhibition.

Through an organic body of work of installations, photographs, signed multiples, or prints, the artist cultivates his aesthetic of vibrant colors surge. He incorporates writings and natural elements as energies that assist the work in the creative process.

The exhibition is accompanied by music as a means to awaken awareness for the vibrations of the art. The artist becomes aware of the completion of the work when it resonates wholly, as both music and art can touch a higher frequency. The colors tones he applies frenetically, like music notes dancing on the drawings, interact with what is true to the soul, and trigger all the senses.  

On the main original canvas, the thick layers of paint are the essence of his “panning technique”, a process usually associated with audio recording. Infinitely adjustable and rotative, his works exceed the fixed gaze and suggest an expansive view and endless possibilities of interpretations.

 

 

The Experience is thus incredibly immersive and takes the individual into the heart of the latter’s self universe. Moving forms devoid of a figurative depiction, his collection of paintings morphs depending on what resonates to the viewer’s subconscious. Carlos W. Desrosiers is adamant about knowing what people perceive in his abstract landscapes, unfolding what is beyond our past and life experiences. He always seeks to manifest a different reality with innovative perspectives, and to truly engage with the everyday curious onlooker, stating that his work is “a clear mirror of self for the observer.”

Carlos W. Desrosiers’ artistic expression hinges indeed upon this notion of movement and collective subconscious. His genius resides in his creative power and spiritual overview, his belief that every object of the world possesses innate wisdom. Before considering himself as an artist 6 years ago, he had an inner desire to transfer his knowledge of the mind and “the esoteric and healing power of men” into a tangible way to awaken humanity.

 

 

Very passionate about all healing techniques including Taoism, self-development, and kinesiology, he was impacted from a young age by the “healing world” as his father is a naturopathic doctor. His thirst for knowledge, the consciousness of his self-awakening paved the way for the discovery of his real duty as an artist, and each crafted piece revealed him new techniques.

When first meditating on art history, he felt an immediate connection with Jackson Pollock’s artistic splattering as an intuitively free and uncontrollable process. What Carlos W. Desrosiers calls his “subconscious reprogramming” techniques takes on form in the painting act through losing control of his hands, leaving the physical element and unlocking his hidden potential.

 

“Beautiful images emerge out of the erratic and out of the chaos”

 

 

 

With parents coming from Haiti to America, Carlos W. Desrosiers was born in New York City in 1988. While not having an economically privileged background, Desrosiers worked at a golf course for 12 years only to later be emerged into the world of Rap music as an A&R manager at the age of 17. Developing a strong rapport with artist and working on different projects and albums, Desrosiers quickly became a key component to artists and their recording process. He has been evolving in the highest spheres of the Rap/Trap music industry, being very close to top renowned artists like Rihanna, Travis Scott, and Migos.

He created in 2012 his first body of art still in progress named “What You See Collection Private Experience”  including over 20 artworks exhibited at Art Basel Miami and at The Fearless Artist Art Basel Pop Up Gallery in December 2015. His “Living abstract” body of artworks and murals were shown in Lower East Side Manhattan, New York City in February 2016.

 

The Experience by Carlos W. Desrosiers
From 23 June to 31 July 2019
VOS Paris
21 avenue Kleber 75016 Paris

A hopeful breath at the MCA with FEDERICO HERRERO

A hopeful breath at the MCA with FEDERICO HERRERO

A hopeful breath at the MCA with FEDERICO HERRERO

Currently exhibited in the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Federico Herrero has taken over the two-story entrance of the MCA space, with his Alphabet project a recurring motif of communicative and playful patches of colours from the wall to the reflection of coloured lights on the ground.

After a 10 months joint collaboration with the museum through an impressive mural installation, the occasion for an immersion into the colours and the vibrations of the room will soon be ending. Until May 5 2019 the international Costa Rican artist invites the visitor to penetrate the new environment created with enticing pastel colour blocks reminiscent of the flora and fauna of Herrero‘s tropical birthplace.


Observable from the painted windows of the atrium, the city’s buildings are covered and transformed with the artist bright blue, yellow, orange filters. The swift change of season in Chicago allows for a continuously mutable exploration of the relationship between nature and public urban culture, between art and social life.

 

 

Born in 1978 in the midst of the natural density of San Jose, Herrero was influenced by graffiti and urban art, media, and everyday city art but also recalls color field painters and Central America muralist tradition. From his first notoriety at the 2001 Venice Biennale as a young artist, his artwork gradually progressed into more abstract and less figurative forms. The artist has developed his oeuvre from canvas paintings to mural and monumental pieces, usually breaking free from the wall space, challenging usual space restrictions like grounds, corners, ceilings, and windows, in his artistic expression of a chaotic and joyful landscape.  

 

 

Although his paintings first appear as patterns of geometrical drawings or as the mental forms of a mapping process, his idea of linguistic chromatic shapes in the Alphabet exhibition comes across as the perception of living, “jumping from place to place” pigments, crossing boundaries and giving new life and vividness to the environment. He uses a conventional painting technique to produce a multicolored and visual sign language in order to engagingly interact with the architecture and the city of Chicago- directly through formal colours.

One of the world’s largest museum, the MCA was founded in 1967 and offers inventive displays for new contemporary artists, with a permanent collection including more than 2,000 works. The current installation is organized by MCA Associate Curator José Esparza and Pamela Alper Associate Curator.

 

Today, Herrero’s wide range of artworks can be seen worldwide from numerous exhibitions in museums or galleries to public installations and he has become one of the major figures in the Latin America contemporary art scene. This October he will be exhibiting at the James Cohan Gallery while his future solo shows will take place in Brazil at the Niterói Contemporary Art Museum in Rio de Janeiro in August 2019 and in São Paulo at the Pivô art center in 2020. In his native San José, Herrero will also show his projects at the Museo Nacional de Costa Rica in 2020.