Zao Wou-Ki at Musée d’Art Moderne of Paris: When the painting becomes a sound

Zao Wou-Ki at Musée d’Art Moderne of Paris: When the painting becomes a sound

Zao Wou-Ki at Musée d’Art Moderne of Paris: When the painting becomes a sound

The exhibition “Zao Wou-Ki – L’espace est Silence”, curated by Fabrice Hergott, is the first large exhibition of Zao Wou-Ki in Paris for the last 15 years. It assembled the large-scale paintings and drawings of the master of the abstract painting, who left a very significant trace in the history of European contemporary art.

Very ancient and omnipresent, the music was the first absolutely abstract artistic expression in the human history. For thousands of years, the music was inspiring creators of figurative painting. However, only modern artists dared for the first time to create an utterly abstract painting, capable of being so emotional and impressive as the music.

This utopical ambition firstly appeared in the early 1910’s with the first successful tentatives of some European artists (Wassily Kandinsky, Robert Delaunay, Kazimir Malevich, František Kupka and others) to create a brand new type of painting, capable of transmitting emotions and feelings with the use of non-figurative forms and colors. The more time passed, the more courageous the painters were in their search for an ideal and pure artistic expression. However, for many of them the music, an ancient art, remained the principal source of inspiration.

 

That was the case of Zao Wou-Ki (1920-2013), a Chinese-born artist, living in France since 1948, who is well-known today as one of the most influential abstract painters of the 20th century. Inspired by contemporary music and poetry, he succeeded to create artworks that impact the spectator as the music itself. The flow of colors and forms of his oils on canvas absorbs the viewer, allowing him to feel a rich gamma of emotions as if he was listening to a musical composition. In the same time, his artistic language is complex, with many references and undertones, that is why almost every painting or drawing of the artist is a multi-dimensional artwork, which can be rethought and reconstructed.

The elegant combination of western achievements of abstract painting with eastern calligraphic and picturesque traditions made Zao Wou-Ki an emblematic figure of the international art scene in the age of globalization. Inspired by his favorite western artists, like Monet or Matisse, he always had a specific eastern perception of their art and was capable of transcribing it on canvas or paper.

Zao Wou-Ki arrived in France in 1948. Sometime later he discovered French impressionist and post-impressionist art and also met a poet Henri Michaux and a contemporary composer Edgar Varèse, people, who significantly affected the young artist. That was a time when Zao Wou-Ki adopted a new artistic expression of the abstract painting, even if the term ‘abstract’ seemed to him too radical and inappropriate at the moment. In 1956, remaining under the influence of contemporary music and a new wave of American and French artists, Zao Wou-Ki created “Traversée des appearances” (oil on canvas, 97 x 195 cm), a masterpiece that determined a new, ‘non-figurative’ period in his artistic career.

 

Then, the talented artist started experimenting on a large canvas, developing his iconic style of abstract painting. Fascinated by music, he created in 1964 an artwork named “Hommage à Edgar Varèse – 25.10.64” (oil on canvas, 255 x 345 cm), a large canvas that absorbed the artist’s respect to the composer. This magnificent work illustrates the artist’s capability to depict even the music with its intangible vibrations and rhythm.

Dynamic or calm, colorful or nearly monochrome, rapturous our disturbing, Zao Wou-Ki’s art spoke to everyone. However, after transcending the boundaries of human expression, the artist did not stop and decided to transcend the time. His admiration for the Monet’s “Nymphéas” let him to the creation of “Hommage à Claude Monet, February-June 91” (oil on canvas, triptych, 1991, 194 x 483 cm), a quasi-figurative painting with an unusual combination of cold and warm colors. “Hommage à Matisse I – 02.02.86I” (oil on canvas, 1986, 162 x 130 cm) is a wholly different abstraction, which awakens some nostalgic memories due to monochrome stripes and emblematic palette.

Inspired by contemporary music and poetry, he succeeded to create artworks that impact the spectator as the music itself. The flow of colors and forms of his oils on canvas absorbs the viewer, allowing him to feel a rich gamma of emotions as if he was listening to a musical composition.

However, the most important artistic breakthrough was waiting for him ahead. Zao Wou-Ki newer stopped experimenting, and at the end of his career, he turned to Chinese ink drawings on a large-scale paper. Was it a new step in the evolution of abstract painting or the return to the origins –  the Chinese calligraphy, this new art helped Zao Wou-Ki to achieve an incredible freedom of expression and also to achieve the recognition of the drawing as part of the contemporary art market.

Artworks of the Chinese-born master of abstraction, exposed in the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, were crucial for the history of art, determining turning points of the artist’s career. He died in 2013, remaining one of the greatest artists of the past century, recognized by experts, collectors and the public.

Under the radar: STPI

Under the radar: STPI

ArtPremium had the chance to interview Emi Eu, director of STPI, a creative workshop and gallery located in Singapore. Exhibiting artists such as Anri Sala, Jane Lee, Do Ho Suh, Rirkrit Tiravanija and more, and celebrating their 15th Anniversary, STPI has position itself as a forward thinking organization working closely with public institutions.


15 years ago when STPI was inaugurated, the director struggled to convince artists to come over Singapore to participate in their residency programs. Now, after a long journey and having witnessed the globalization and booming of the contemporary art market, Eu affirms they no longer have to fight to persuade creators to come to the city. Aided by the national government – 20% of their annual budget is provided by them – STPI’s financial plan is a genuine model of a successful partnership between public and private sectors working together to position Singapore in the contemporary art radar. Another strategy they have been developing is to participate in international art fairs, “the art fairs are for us the best marketing platforms, as we are far aways from the culture centres such as London, Paris, or New York, we connect with the rest of the world”, stated Eu during our exchange.

But what is STPI’s objective and what distinguishes them from other galleries? Aside the financial scheme, the gallery focuses on working with artists that focus on paper and print making. “The artist must possess the caliber of working in a collaborative environment, he must be capable of taking advantage of all the resources we have for their disposition”, stated Eu. Artists such as Sun Xun, Ashley Bickerton, Philippe Parreno, Teresita Fernández, Haegue Yang, among others, have participated in their workshops. And yet, there are some artists that before working with STPI never worked on paper, STPI is therefore a laboratory for those creators.

Until November 11th 2017, STPI will be exhibiting the work of Alfredo and Isabel Aquilizan, a duo of artists breaking frontiers and experiments with the shapes of papers. We are eager to see what new will be the forthcoming projects of this unique space.

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Prix Marcel Duchamp to Hadjithomas & Joreige

Prix Marcel Duchamp to Hadjithomas & Joreige

Prix Marcel Duchamp 2017 Joana Hadjithomas et Khalil Joreige ∏ Centre Pompidou, 2017, Audrey Laurans (9)

Prix Marcel Duchamp 2017 Joana Hadjithomas et Khalil Joreige – Centre Pompidou, 2017, Audrey Laurans

 

Once again the time has come to disclose the winner of the prestigious French award, the “ Prix Marcel Duchamp ” given by the ADIAF. This year’s edition has been bestowed to the Lebanese duo Joanna Hadjithomas and Khalil Joreige. Both from an Arabic background, the pair collaborates producing documentaries and visual artworks conveying a “humanitarian message”, according to the director of the ADIAF Gilles Fuchs. This is the reason why the pair was awarded the prize, as their body of work is politically engaged; furthermore it depicts the blending of two cultures the French and the Lebanese.

The Prix Marcel Duchamp, created in 2000 was created to grant artists who chose to work in France international notoriety in order to position them in the contemporary art globalized world. Since its genesis, it has awarded artists such as Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Mircea Cantor, Kader Attia, Thomas Hirschhorn and more.

For the first time, alongside the financial aid (35 000 euros), the ADIAF gave the artists a sculpture made by Fabrice Hyber with “eau de Paris” symbolizing the playful spirit of Marcel Duchamp.

 

Inspiring Actions, Martin Schoeller at Paris Photo with Pernod Ricard

Inspiring Actions, Martin Schoeller at Paris Photo with Pernod Ricard

Elna Nordstrom - Pernod Ricard Ary_Ganeshalingam - Pernod Ricard Ilargi_Leturia_Ugarte - Pernod Ricard
Ary Ganeshalingam – Global Marketing Manager
Chivas Brothers Ltd – London, United Kingdom
© Martin Schoeller pour / for Pernod Ricard

 

Elna Nordström – Product Development Manager Operations.
The Absolut Company – Ahus, Sweden
© Martin Schoeller pour / for Pernod Ricard
Ilargi Leturia Ugarte – Global Brand Manager
Pernod Ricard Winemakers – San Sebastian, Spain
© Martin Schoeller pour / for Pernod Ricard

German photographer, Martin Schoeller worked conjointly with the French company Pernod Ricard to photograph some of the faces that constitute the company’s spectrum of employees.

The idea behind this project was to take 18 portraits of Pernod Ricard’s employees all over the world in order to show to the public the people who construct and expand the brand’s name. With the texture and light characterising Schoeller’s portraits, the photographer highlighted the brand’s work ethic and aimed at bearing witness of the importance of each employee. Every portrait is different and captures the detail of the person photographed, Schoeller thus highlights the uniqueness and beauty of the members of the company.

Pernod Ricard Group often calls upon contemporary artists to campaign with them to put under the spot their employees and their importance within the company. Among other artists who have participated we can cite Omar Victor Diop, Li Wei, Olaf Breuning, Vee Speers, Marco Lopez and more. Martin Schoeller  (b. 1968, Munich, works and live in New York City)  is the 42th artist invited to participate in this kind of project, perpetuating the tradition and bearing witness of Pernod Ricard’s commitment to contemporary art.

At the end of 2017, the campaign will be exhibited at Paris Photo 2017 international fair from 9  to 12 of November at the Grand Palais.. “This people are our ambassadors for our values and become a source of inspiration,” stated Olivier Cavil, director of communication for Pernod Ricard.

Printing the World at Centre Pompidou

Printing the World at Centre Pompidou

Imprimer le monde Achraf Touloub_Dessein Global 2015 (dÇtail) Impression 3 D photo Gilles Puyfages

Achraf Touloub, Dessein Global 2015 (deetail) Impression 3 D. Photo: Gilles Puyfages

 

The gallery 4 at the Centre Pompidou in Paris is currently presenting Printing the World, an exhibition taking place until the 3rd of July, exploring the 3D universe and its possibilities.

In 1984 the first 3D printer was patented by a French research group giving birth to a new era in the material world. Little had they known of the incommensurable possibilities that this machine had to offer, especially in the art world. The show presents approximately 40 artists, designers and architects conjointly questioning and using the 3D printer to create new and improbable objects.

Imprimer le monde Jon Rafman_New Age Demanded (Pocked), 2013_Courtesy de l'artiste

Jon Rafman, New Age Demanded (Pocked), 2013, Courtesy of the artist

From the macro world with creations such as Grotto II by Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger, to the micro world where the 3D printer is utilised to print cells, this technology is revolutionizing the way we conceive art and its status. Unlike other techniques, the 3D printer can faithfully copy what is it told to reproduce, it enables artists, designers and craftsman to almost attain perfection. For instance, the designer Mathias Bengtsson has created a steady table mixing different materials.

Thus, what is the artist’s role in this universe? If the object can entirely be produce by a machine, where lies the future of art? Inventiveness is the key, for 3D remains a tool and not a threat for artists such as Jon Rafman who has conceived an odd – to say the least – universe with his 3D printed torsos and his animated videos. On the other hand, the transdisciplinary artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg recreated a 3D portrait from recollected chewed up gum, hairs and cigarette butts that people in New York city left unwittingly behind them.

Imprimer le monde University of Tokyo Advanced Design Studies Unit_Drawn Pavilion_2017

University of Tokyo Advanced Design Studies Unit Drawn Pavilion 2017

 

Once again artists and science converge in an effort to bring fresh and new proposals to the table. The exhibition, despite its shortness succeeds as preface of what is yet to come.

 

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South Africa under the spotlight at the Venice Biennial

South Africa under the spotlight at the Venice Biennial

South Africa - The 57th International Art Exhibition_La Biennale di VeneziaSouth Africa –  The 57th International Art Exhibition_La Biennale di Venezia

 

Two major artists, Candice Breitz and Mohau Modisakeng, are representing South Africa at the 57th edition of the Venice Biennale. Under the direction of Christine Macel, Viva Arte Viva is a celebratory venue highlighting art and artist’s power in our society. 

Nevertheless, rather than praising art and the people making it, the two young creators decided to give the opportunity to immigrants and other minorities to speak about their conditions and the encountered difficulties experienced throughout their journey. Candice Breitz’s short film Love Story is a raw statement where she questions the dehumanisation within our world. Marked by famine, displacement and humanitarian crisis, the 21st century is increasingly obsessed with show business, relegating or even denying to see alarming issues. By using Hollywood actors – Julianne Moore and Alec Baldwin -, Breitz reroutes the public’s attention to this field giving a voice to millions of unknown refugees.

On the other hand, Mohau Modisakeng explores South African “male” identity during the post apartheid era. His work delves on the meaning of nation, gender and postcolonialism in the country.

Regardless of Mrs. Macel intention, Breitz and Modisakeng believe in art not so much as a narcissist way of expression but as a political outlet.  

 

Credits
SOUTH AFRICA (Republic of), Candice Breitz and Mohau Modisakeng
57. Esposizione Internazionale d’Arte – La Biennale di Venezia, Viva Arte Viva
Photo by: Italo Rondinella
Courtesy: La Biennale di Venezia
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A Basquiat Skull Painting Breaks $100M at Sotheby’s

A Basquiat Skull Painting Breaks $100M at Sotheby’s

The most expensive skull of Basquiat sold to japanese collector Maezawa for $ 110.5 million at Sotheby’s in 2017 on show at Louis Vuitton Foundation

Jean-Michel Basquiat. Untitled, 1982. Acrylic, spray paint, and oilstick on canvas. 183.2 × 173 cm. Yusaku Maezawa Collection, Chiba, Japan © Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York. Picture: Courtesy of Sotheby’s, Inc. © 2018

 

Thursday 18th May marked an unprecedented record at Sotheby’s New York during the Contemporary sales evening, making of Jean-Michel Basquiat the most coveted American artist with the sale of a skull painting over the $100 million barrier.

Untitled (1982) painting has been acquired for 110.5 million dollars by the billionaire Japanese entrepreneur and art collector Yusaku Maezawa, 41, founder of START TODAY an online fashion mall.This work becomes the second most expensive artwork ever auctioned, after Francis Bacon’sThree Studies of Lucian Freud (triptych, 1969) sold for $142,2  million at Christie’s in 2013.

Fervent to his love for Basquiat, Maezawa’s plan is to exhibit this and other acquired works in his hometown, Chiba, a city nearby the nipone capital. Among his collection, artworks from artists such as Jeff Koons, Alexander Calder, Bruce Nauman, Vincent Van Gogh and Richard Prince will be featured in his private museum.

Even though the museum’s construction is still on hold, Mr. Maezawa seems to know exactly how he envisions his institution as he stated he wants each art piece to breathe and to be thoroughly contemplated by his future audience.

Despite a short period of active creation, only 10 years, Jean-Michel Basquiat  (1960-1988) left a prolific oeuvre behind him. After his death, his artworks have attained staggering prices during auctions and sales placing him alongside great master such as Van Gogh or Pablo Picasso.

 

Building Bridges, Not Walls

Building Bridges, Not Walls

Millares_Cuadro 32_1957

Cuadro 32, 1957-1958 , Mixed media on burlap, 127 x 153cm

 

Until the 25th of July 2017, the gallery Mayoral in Barcelona will be presenting Building Bridges, not Walls, a retrospective of the Spanish artist Manolo Millares curated by Alfonso de la Torre and Elena Sorokina.

Marked by violent conflicts such as the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and the Second World War, Millares oeuvre depicts the violence of a world submerged into despair and complete chaos. His torn compositions echo those of artists such as Fautrier or Hans Hartung were the absence of form is supplanted by turbulent compositions.

Among the artworks displayed, Cuadro 32, one of the artist’s tutelar paintings exhibited during the 19th Venice Biennale, Divertimento para un político and Personaje Caído give a thorough panorama of his artistic evolution throughout the years.  

Additionally, the retrospective is screening the documentary Millares, 1970. Made by the artist and his wife, the film is a visual study on war consequences. Constructed with archive images, footage of devastated landscapes and Millares’ canvases, the film’s aim is to deliver a lesson on war.

To conclude with, the gallery will be displaying documentation to help to better understand the artist’s universe.

 

Millares97A0786

Personaje caído, 1967, Mixed media on burlap , 150 x 150 cm
Personaje caído, 1967, Mixed media on burlap , 150 x 150 cm
Homúnculo (1), 1964 , 1967, Mixed media on burlap , 130 x 96.5 cm
Homúnculo (1), 1964 , 1967, Mixed media on burlap , 130 x 96.5 cm

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in_out_paradis_artificiels_09

On a warm, breezy Spring’s day, a brilliantly iridescent dome adorns the Domaine Park of Chaumont-sur-Loire. The futuristic appearance of the installation entitled IN-OUT/ Artificial Paradises 2017 by French digital artist Miguel Chevalier is rather oddly in harmony with the Renaissance château and garden thanks to its reflective exterior mirroring the exuberance of the sunlight and the surrounding greenery.

IN-OUT / Artificial Paradises 2017 spans across at a diameter of 12 metres. The structure is a demi-sphere with a wooden framework, covered in holographic films in order to capture the prismic glory of the Sun.

Visitors are invited to embark on a journey between the real and the virtual garden within the dome, to be transported in an instant to a reality beyond our everyday physical experience. The artist’s generative digital installation Trans-Natures is projected on the curved walls at 360°, reflected by towering mirrors installed around the interior of the dome as well as the glistening black vinyl floor mimicking a visually echoing lake surface. Italian composer and expert in interactive and generative music Jacopo Baboni Schilingi orchestrates in particular a piece of music to compliment the mysterious floral apparitions in the artwork. It is an experience at once meditative and transformative.

in_out_paradis_artificiels_04

IN-OUT / Artificial Paradises 2017 explores the question of the link between nature and artifice as a full-body hypnotic poem. According to the approach prevalent in the late 90s, Chevalier bases this creation on the observation of the munificence of plant life and transposes such abundance into the digital universe. Different species of trees, bushes, twigs, and foliages congregate to form an artificial ecosystem. This virtual biosphere’s structure generates and regenerates ad infinitum abstract arboreal forms in consonance with the algorithm written by Claude Micheli.

The artwork challenges the visitor’s spatial limits. Enveloped by this digital microcosm, the visitor develops a novel sense of distance towards the infinite. From now through to 2 November 2017 at the Domaine of Chaumont-sur-Loire, this vegetal ritual celebrates the beauty of life, an eternal Spring.

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Venice Biennial: Viva Arte Viva

Venice Biennial: Viva Arte Viva

Gaggiandre-2015_AVZ9496

The 57th Venice Biennale is about to open its doors in May 13th. With the title, Viva Art Viva curator Christine Macel intends to celebrate artists, their work and life in this year’s edition.

The selection made by Macel was based upon a theme instead of the traditional diagram which divided the event in countries. Of the 120 artists invited, 103 are exhibiting their work for the first time at the Biennial, the organisers are thus encouraging an innovative aesthetic experience. Among the newcomers we find artists such as Kader Attia, Sebastian Diaz Morales, Tibor Hajas, Mai Lara, Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa and more. The idea behind the project, as stated by both, curator and the president of the event, M. Paolo Baratta was to celebrate humanism and art’s capacity to liberate the mind.

Taking us on a journey, the 9 pavilions are “like chapters of a book” connecting with each other. The first one, Pavilion of Artists and books delves in the importance of research and productive idleness for an artist. It is during this period of time that artists acquire knowledge and can create new ways of seeing the world. In a tension between purposely inaction, this pavilion aims at demonstrate how artists work and construct environments like workshops or studios to achieve their goals. The next chapter, The Pavilion of joys and fears is an introspective chamber where the artist and the spectator are confronted to negative emotions, feelings of alienation resounding in the political arena. Once again the rise of populism and the fear of the “other”, the stranger is scrutinized through the artist’s prisms.

Miller-Dan

Other pavilion name’s include the pavilion of traditions which analyses the proliferation of religion and of conservative morals; the pavilion of the earth examining ecological utopias and nostalgic futures; the Dionysian pavilion who celebrates the female body and so on. Viva Arte Viva is an organic and living habitat emulating the pulse of time and its mutating nature. It celebratory narratives aims at giving hope, by giving voice to young and lesser known artists, the Biennial design is to include in the contemporary art circuit those struggling to be part of the system.
Viva Arte Viva is a clamour by artists, it goes beyond art and reveres life itself. In dark times, art appears as a possibility giving hope.

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Withney Biennial: America’s Condition

Withney Biennial: America’s Condition

08_RafaEsparza_Install_2017Biennial

Installation view of Rafa Esparza, Figure Ground: Beyond the White Field, 2017. Whitney Biennial 2017, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, March 17-June 11, 2017. Photograph by Matthew Carasella

 

Initiated in 1932 the Whitney Biennial  “not only reflects but foreshadows the uncertain, bitter, and divided state” of a nation struggling to cope with change. According to curator Christopher Y. Lew., the biennial is thus a barometer measuring and indicating the state of mind of a population facing political deception. 63 artists present pieces mirroring the current feelings and thoughts of a population submerged in an identity crisis where race, immigration and gender are the nexus uniting the whole.

It is impossible not to notice the preponderance of oil painting and form in the biennial. For instance Celeste Dupuy-Spencer canvas Fall with me for a million days portraitures a young man immersed in his laptop, seemingly listening to music gives a snapshot of the American and by extension of the global youth.

 

15_Dupuy-Spencer.C_02.sm

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Fall with Me for a Million Days (My Sweet Waterfall), 2016.
Oil on canvas, 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9 cm).
Private collection; courtesy the artist and Mier Gallery, Los Angeles

 

Another example of the amplitude of oil painting is the work made by Aliza Nisenbaum, La Talaverita in which a couple reads The New York Times in what seems to be a living room, surrounded by a Mexican decoration. It seems that the biennial has put an end to a long quarrel between abstract painting – associated with abstract expressionism – and form – associated with rather European painters such as Francis Bacon.

 

10_Nisebnaum.A_01sm

Aliza Nisenbaum, La Talaverita, Sunday Morning NY Times, 2016.
Oil on linen, 68 x 88 in. (172.7 x 223.5 cm).
Collection of the artist; courtesy T293 Gallery, Rome and Mary Mary, Glasgow

The selection of artists and artworks alike, done before the election, shows a positive feeling.

Video’s presence reinforces its importance and its role as a political predilected vehicle. Eric Baudelaire oeuvre titled Also known as Jihad uses landscape theory to portray the fate of a young Islamic State recruit. Puerto Rican artist Beatriz Santiago Munoz filmed in Haiti the disrupting consequences of colonialism and its ecosystem. Giving another perspective of the possibilities of video, Mary Helena Clark videos experiment with sound and image taking the audience to new image horizons, creating unusual ecosystems.

The selection of artists and artworks alike, done before the election, shows a positive feeling. Some of the presented works like the installation created by Rafa Esparza, a rotonde made with “adobe” emphasise on the artist’s origins. His construction not only highlights his family background but challenges the white cube space narratives.

Despite the scandals and recent protests, the biennial succeeds at giving the spectators a wide and very complete panorama of the American condition.

 

29_Yi.A_02
Anicka Yi, still from The Flavor Genome, 2016. 3D high-definition video, color, sound; 22 min.
Collection of the artist; courtesy the artist and 47 Canal, New York

 

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Living with Art

Living with Art

27th Street_Edited

Photo Credit: Jonathan Sciortino

From hinterland to the next epicentre of art, fashion and innovation, West Chelsea, running from Ninth Avenue to the Hudson River and from West 14th to West 30th Streets in Manhattan, welcomes another upcoming gallery initiative in this charming and vibrant 21st century neighbourhood.

On the construction site of what will soon be a set of 15 new art galleries surrounding Zaha Hadid’s 520 West 28th Street condominium residences, Related Companies has unveiled two exciting graffiti-art installations surfacing along the existing corrugated metal walls and gates. Passers-by can enjoy the work by Jonathan Cohen a.k.a. Meres One, the founder of 5Pointz, and another graffiti artist, See TF in the anticipation of what is to come.

Related Companies, the most prominent privately-owned real estate developer in the United States, announced the collection of new gallery spaces in early March 2017. This hybrid gallery-eatery space, High Line Nine will encompass nine of such galleries located under the High Line and will include a cafe and a wine bar. Related has taken the European galleria concept to a collection of nine full service and highly amenitized boutique exhibition spaces, ranging from 650 sf to 1,800 sf. Art patrons and visitors to West Chelsea will have a new must-see destination and unique gallery experience. The acclaimed Paul Kasmin Gallery, founded in SoHo and now occupying three locations in West Chelsea, will anchor the collection with a 5,000 sf gallery and an additional exhibition space in the High Line Nine.

28th St_Edited_4

Photo Credit: Jonathan Sciortino

“West Chelsea has long been known as an important arts district,” affirmed Greg Gushee, Executive VIce President of Related Companies, “and we are pleased to partner with two distinguished artists to create vibrant temporary murals on both West 27th Street and West 28th Street. The energy and vitality of the area make it an ideal location for these pieces and they are sure to be a draw as we develop a new collection of gallery spaces on this site adjacent to Zaha Hadid’s sculptural building at 520 West 28th Street, which is itself a monumental piece of art.” Meres One and See TF, both veterans of the New York contemporary graffiti art scene, recreate the facades as a realistic trompe l’oeil, portraying artistic visuals of the upcoming gallery spaces, being observed by onlookers through realistic painted windows.

The works are installed temporarily until the walls and gates are required to be removed to facilitate the completion of the construction. This graffiti art initiative celebrates wonderful diversity of the West Chelsea gallery district; it is a gesture of partnership between real estate developers and street artists.