Dylan Rheingold

Dylan Rheingold

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Dylan Rheingold

Age: 24
Location: NYC
@drr_drr_ (IG)
www.dylanroserheingold.com/

Dylan Rheingold is an illustrator based out of New York City. She has a heavy interest in the areas of social realism, diversity & gender equality. She tends to work on a large scale as she draws connections between these elements through an abstraction of color, shape and line density. She received her BFA in Illustration from Syracuse University in 2019. 

STATEMENT

Coming from a home filled with contrasting ethnicities, cultures, sexualities and religions, she was lucky enough to be exposed to many differences from a very young age. Dylan Rose is very aware of the unfortunate truth that many are not blessed with this same luxury. As a result, she attempts to create works that subconsciously force these ironic narratives of contrast & acceptance on the viewer. Shining a positive light on those who stray from society’s guidelines of cookie cutter glamour and perfection. 

She is especially fascinated by the little details embedded within everyday lifestyles. These little details include how one dresses, what one eats, where one lives and other recreational activities or ways one may spend their free time. She enjoys creating paintings and drawings that expose and combine various everyday notions in order to produce an unconventional perspective. She has also conducted a great deal of socio-geographic, psychological and financial research regarding how people become or are born into their cultural and social class settings. From being born in New York City, to move to a small provincial suburban town in Long Island, to attending University in one of the most poverty stricken cities in America, exploring the degrees of contrast she has been to exposed came as second nature.

Specifically, the fluidity of relationships between those adored in modern day society and those straying from these idealist molds. Her paintings are non traditional as they are all mixed media; balancing layers of paint drawn over with ink, conte crayon & china marker. A great deal of inspiration for her paintings also come from raiding old bookstores with found photographs, antique postcards, newspapers and magazines.

After purchasing the remains of an anonymous family photo album, she began painting and drawing over these strangers. Throughout her collecting process she was fascinated by the degree of difference she had acquired within her subjects. These many images found in both popular and unpopular media exposed varying degrees of setting, social class, race, sexual orientations, age and expression.

More than anything she aims to connect these separated groups/figures and recreate the sense of contrast co-existing between them. Regardless of the way one was born, raised or physically appears either if it’s by nature or choice, we are all people.

Daniela Ruiz de Esparza

Daniela Ruiz de Esparza

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Daniela Ruiz de Esparza

Age: 26
Guadalajara, Mexico
@venusdormida (IG)

Published on ArtPremium Magazine Winter 2020, page 103.

Daniela Ruiz de Esparza  is a 24 year old visual artist based in Guadalajara, Mexico. Her work is dynamic and revolves around representations of herself and other women as a means of catharsis. She uses photography to depict her reality and her reflections on it.  

STATEMENT

As I change, so does the definition of my work. If I had to define my work two years ago, I would have written a completely different thing. At this moment in my life, I would say that it expresses the extraordinary in people and places, that I come across on a daily basis. I’ve found that my safe place is within me and around other women, and I truly think they are the source of inspiration for most of my work.

Everything works as a cycle; I started photographing silly stuff and my daily routine, then I started capturing women around me, and when I moved to a place that I didn’t know anyone, I went back to photographing my routine and myself. Analog photography has helped me in the process of becoming; I’m in love with the ritual, the unexpected, improvisation and uniqueness of each shot. I live in Mexico, and as any other country, it has it’s pretty and ugly side, unfortunately the bad side is becoming more and more prominent and thus it’s difficult to exist as a woman here, I’m obligated to see the pretty in the ugly and right now the personal seems more political than ever. 

I am afraid of the oblivious, I feel like everything vanishes and I need to be there to see it and capture it. Photography has helped me to have another perception of life and to become closer to those who I place in front of the camera; I’ve learnt to fall in love with strangers, objects and nature. My work is a self-exploration of my definition of beauty, catharsis and uniqueness. 

 

1-54 Paris opens at Christie’s

1-54 Paris opens at Christie’s

1-54 Paris opens at Christie’s

Mous LamrabatFresh from the garden of Compton, 2019Courtesy Loft Art Gallery

1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair, the leading international art fair dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and the African diaspora, holds its first-ever fair in Paris from Wednesday 20 to Saturday 23 January at Christie’s Avenue Matignon location and online.

1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair, the leading international art fair dedicated to contemporary art from Africa and the African diaspora, holds its first-ever fair in Paris from Wednesday 20 to Saturday 23 January at Christie’s Avenue Matignon location and online.

Delphine DesanePeculiar Tint, 2020. Courtesy Luce Gallery

The fair welcomes 20 international exhibitors: 31 PROJECT (Paris, France); 50 Golborne (London, United Kingdom); Galerie Dominique Fiat (Paris, France); Galerie 127 (Marrakech, Morocco); Galerie Anne de Villepoix (Paris, France); Galerie Cécile Fakhoury (Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire/ Dakar, Senegal); Galerie Eric Dupont (Paris, France); Galerie Lelong & Co. (Paris, France / New York, USA); Galerie  Nathalie Obadia (Paris, France / Brussels, Belgium); GALLERIA CONTINUA (Beijing, China / Havana, Cuba / Les Moulins, France / San Gimignano, Italy / Rome, Italy); Gallery 1957 (Accra, Ghana / London, United Kingdom); Loft Art Gallery (Casablanca, Morocco); Luce Gallery (Turin, Italy); MAGNIN-A (Paris, France); Nil Gallery (Paris, France); POLARTICS (Lagos, Nigeria); SEPTIEME Gallery (Paris, France); THIS IS NOT A WHITE CUBE (Luanda, Angola); THK Gallery (Cape Town, South Africa); Wilde (Geneva, Switzerland).

Prince Gyasi, The 12 Powers. Courtesy Nil Gallery

1-54 online, powered by Christie’s is now open physically and online. The online platform allows global audiences to view and buy all works presented as well as instantly organize shipping through new technology from fair partner Convelio.

1-54 SPECIAL PROJECT

In the foyer at Christie’s, 1-54 presents Aloalo, a new installation showcased by the non-profit organization Azé, in collaboration with André Magnin and Emmanuel Perrotin. Originally erected to honor deceased relatives, aloalos are traditional sculptures that have been crafted by the Mahafaly from south Madagascar since the 18th century. This special project brings together work by Efiaimbelo, one of the first sculptors to have painted aloalos for decorative purposes. Each aloalo depicts a situation inspired by daily life, fairy tales, or legends, the knowledge of which has been shared down by the clan since the teachings of his ancestor Soroboko.

 

Kwesi BotchwayMetamorphose in July, 2020. Courtesy of the artist and Gallery 1957

1-54 FORUM

This special edition not only welcome galleries from across Africa and Europe, but also 1-54 Forum, the fair’s multi-disciplinary program of talks, screenings, performances, workshops, and readings

Entitled Crafting wor[l]ds: for a vernacular economy of art and curated for the first time by LE 18, the only navigating through, but also engaged with the deep material and epistemic fractures produced and reproduced by capitalism, modernity, and (neo) colonialism over the past centuries. While questioning the very role that the artist can play in a world in crisis, 1-54 Forum looks in particular at the ways in which new ecologies of cultural practices are emerging, drawing from vernacular principles and circular dynamics. The all-digital program is taking place over the evenings of the fair, and then throughout the month of February.

COVID-19 and Cultural Life in Bahrain

COVID-19 and Cultural Life in Bahrain

COVID-19 and Cultural Life in Bahrain

With the movement of people limited; museums, theatres, and heritage sites have all been halted due to the crises that struck the cultural life and tourism industry. COVID-19 took the whole world by surprise. No one was prepared for the crisis and thoughts of when will it end lingers on every single person’s mind.

We, as human beings, share this issue with all individuals across the world. As an artist, field exhibitions, events, and performances are either canceled or postponed. In order to keep the creative spirit alive, intensive efforts to provide alternatives through digital platforms are visible. In the case of Bahraini artists, we have maintained a positive attitude and proactively participate in online events that allow us to continue exchanging ideas and convey our creativity between each other and to the online presence.

Additionally, art has been keeping us all motivated and alive. visuals, tangible items of all shapes and sizes, and our everyday creations empower us to overcome this void that has been left due to the COVID-19. With the assistance of art, we can feel limitless, even during the lockdown. After all, we are vulnerable individuals that suffered from sudden detachment from our daily routines.

Yet, I still consider this period a golden phase for artistic and creative production in general, for I am one who took advantage of this period of creativity and as the writer, Daniel Carnegie says ‘the ideas of a positive man do not end, and the negative however has no end to his excuses.’ An example of this is seen through one of Picasso’s most influential pieces that he drew in only in black and white. It was a result of what happened in the village of Guernica after the extermination of 2,000 people and the destruction of an entire village.

Like the Ying-Yang philosophy, this issue can be viewed through the same lenses. Due to the cancelation of most social events and postponed deadlines, artists can now dedicate a considerable amount of time to further discover themselves. Related to Picasso’s art, this enables them to push their limits by stepping out of their comfort zones and attempt different types of art and all forms of artistic expressions.

Schopenhauer says, that ‘The less one has to have contact with others, the better for him.’  Personally, I could not agree more. By having less contact with the outside world and more time to myself, I was able to become more productive. Adding all those tiny details on my artwork, writing articles, and reading all of the books left unread on the shelves for months.

I was also able to further my understanding of many topics all thanks to the unity and compassionate academic world. Universities and organizations started to offer unlimited workshops and courses for free. I was able to widen my scope of understanding in topics such as history, world affairs, art, and heritage. It is very fascinating to see how every sector played a role in combating the results caused by the pandemic. Another factor that also played a significant role in social media. This pandemic has almost eradicated all communication with society, even with family members, but social media has played a significant role in giving us this tool to remain connected despite these circumstances.

To Heal the World (15 June-18 August 2020) is one of many virtual exhibitions that I recently participated in—it is an international online artistic reflection on mending the damage to our global family (https://www.oncaravan.org/tohealtheworld). Another art exhibition arranged by  the US Embassy in Bahrain is in collaboration with Bahrain Arts society, and titled “Creativity in the Age of Corona virus exhibition.” Also, social media played a vital role in spreading art during this period @makan.artgallery is another virtual art exhibition where I exhibit three artworks.

 Instagram @mayasa205

***

Mayasa Sultan Al Sowaidi is a self-taught artist from the Kingdom of Bahrain. She earned a BS degree in Mathematics from the University of Bahrain and an MBA from the New York Institute of Technology. With a background in mathematics, balance and order are important components of her artistic practice. Al Sowaidi is a member of the Bahrain Art Society and has participated in numerous exhibitions in Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Cyprus, Dubai, and Oman.  She has been recognized with numerous other prizes and awards. 

Justin Keene

Justin Keene

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Justin Keene

Age: 29
London, UK
@justinkeene_ (IG)

Published on ArtPremium Magazine Winter 2020, page 109.

Justin Keene is a fine art photographer based in London.  His photographic work explores the relationship between identity and a sense of belonging in South Africa. He has been highlighted in various platforms, festivals, and publications. 

STATEMENT

Justin’s independent projects reframe the documentary approach as a collaborative process with the people he photographs. His work reviews the ethics of photographic practice and its impact on contemporary art in South Africa. Justin reflects on concepts of self in relation to cultural identity and belonging as a way of interpreting the country’s political history. 

Justin explores South Africa as a post-colony – working under the backdrop of the country’s colonial legacy, his work challenges the viewer to position themselves in relation to history, creating a renewed vision for the future. By focusing on youth, Justin’s work forms part of contemporary photographic consciousness in South Africa to reformulate the gaze of photography in Africa. His projects seek to create a renewed visual economy for the country; drawing on the significance of photography for identity in South Africa; departing from associations of documentary realism in providing a critique of historic media representation. 

His work constitutes a collaboration between the artist and the South African people after a historic, nonautonomous representation of the country’s people. Moving forward he intends to produce a book of his current work that explores his own family history in South Africa; focusing on research methods as a way of providing contextual meaning to his narrative.